Home About us Editorial board Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contact Us Login 
An Official Publication of the Indian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathologists


 
  Table of Contents    
ENIGMATIC MORPHO INSIGHT  
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 2-3
 

Bizzare Plasma Cell - Mott Cell


Editor-in-Chief - JOMFP Professor and Head, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Krishnadevaraya College of Dental Sciences, Bangalore, India

Date of Web Publication18-Apr-2013

Correspondence Address:
Radhika M Bavle
Editor-in-Chief - JOMFP Professor and Head, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Krishnadevaraya College of Dental Sciences, Bangalore
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-029X.110682

Rights and Permissions

 



How to cite this article:
Bavle RM. Bizzare Plasma Cell - Mott Cell. J Oral Maxillofac Pathol 2013;17:2-3

How to cite this URL:
Bavle RM. Bizzare Plasma Cell - Mott Cell. J Oral Maxillofac Pathol [serial online] 2013 [cited 2018 Jun 23];17:2-3. Available from: http://www.jomfp.in/text.asp?2013/17/1/2/110682


Mott cells are plasma cells that have spherical inclusions packed in their cytoplasm.

The term 'Mott cell' is named after a surgeon, F. W. Mott, who identified these cells in the brains of monkeys with trypanosomiasis (1901). He termed it morular cell (from the Latin morus, mulberry) and recognized these cells to be plasma cells and therefore indicative of chronic inflammation. Although his name has been attached to the cell, Mott was not the first to describe this appearance. The first description was most likely by William Russell in 1890, however he neither recognized the nature of the cell nor the significance of the inclusions. [1]

The hand-drawn illustration of Mott cell reveals multiple varied size spherical inclusions/ Russell bodies within a single plasma cell having an eccentrically placed clock face nucleus [Figure 1].
Figure 1: A Mott cell with multiple varied size spherical inclusions/ Russell bodies within a single plasma cell having an eccentrically placed clock face nucleus

Click here to view


The photomicrograph showing mott cells with numerous inclusion bodies [Figure 2].
Figure 2: (a-c): Mott cells showing highly refractile inclusion bodies ranging from 3 to 15 in number ( H and E, x400).

Click here to view


The inclusions of Mott cells represent immunoglobulins within vesicular structures. These inclusions are Russell bodies which are dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae containing condensed immunoglobulins (Ig). As to their biogenesis, it was shown that the synthesis of a mutated Ig, which is neither secreted nor degraded, is sufficient to induce Russell body formation in cells. Russell bodies were originally described in plasma cells, and their frequency in this cell type probably correlates with the fact that immunoglobulin genes undergo somatic hypermutation. However, dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cisternae containing condensed aberrant proteins are found in secretory cells of different origins, suggesting condensation of transport-incompetent proteins in the ER as the common cause for this morphological feature. Many disease-linked cases of intraluminal protein accumulation have been described including thyrocytes of congenital goiter patients and hepatocytes of individuals carrying mutated α1 anti-trypsin alleles (PiZ). [2]

Mott cells are characterised by the expression of B220, CD5, CD43, CD11b (Cluster of differentiation). Mott cell formation has been linked to a genetic locus-microsatellite marker (D4Mit70 & D4 Mit 48). Mott-1, in close proximity to the locus lmh-1 is associated with hypergammaglobulinemia. [3]

Various pathological conditions in which Mott cells can be sighted are: reactive plasmacytosis, various hematolymphoid malignancies viz., Burkitt's lymphoma, Large B-cell lymphoma, lymphoplasmablastic lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and syndromic conditions like Wiskott -Aldrich syndrome and von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis. [4]

Various special stains used to highlight Mott cells are Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) and May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG) stain.  [1]

Mott cell in the photomicrograph was encountered in a case of neurofibroma which was reported in our department.


   Acknowledgement Top


(a) Staff - Department of Oral Pathology, Krishnadevaraya College of Dental Sciences, Bangalore, (b) Dr. Sarah S D'Mello, Post graduate student - Department of Oral Pathology, Krishnadevaraya College of Dental Sciences, Bangalore.

 
   References Top

1.Bain BJ. Russel bodies and Mott cells. Am J Hematol 2009;84:516.   Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Kopito RR, Sitia R. Aggresomes and Russell bodies: symptoms of cellular indigestion? EMBO Rep 2000;1:225-31.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Jiang Y, Hirose S, Hamano Y, Kodera S, Tsurui H, Abe M, et al. Mapping of a gene for the increased susceptibility of B1 cells to Mott cell formation in murine autoimmune disease. J Immunol 1997;158:992-7.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Rampisela D, Donner LR. An unusual self limited clonal Mott cell proliferation with lymphoplasmablastic lymphoma like features in child with Wiskott -Aldrich syndrome and von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis. Pathol Res Pract 2010;206:467-71.  Back to cited text no. 4
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

Top
Print this article  Email this article
            

    

 
   Search
 
  
    Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
    Article in PDF (650 KB)
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  


   Acknowledgement
    References
    Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1766    
    Printed54    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded624    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Online since 15th Aug, 2007